Hendon Media Group - Article Archive

The Hendon Media Article Search System allows visitors to search online articles from any of our publications. Below is a list of articles matching your search criteria. Click on an article title to view the entire article.

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Personal Relationship with Subordinates

By Robert Roy Johnson

Take interest in the personal lives of officers to improve working relationships with subordinates.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Mar 2005)
 

Calming Controversy

By Cara Donlon-Cotton

If your officers are involved in controversial situations, such as officer-involved shootings, fatalities after less-than-lethal deployments, in-custody deaths or fatal chases, there are some steps your agency can take to help alleviate the situation. Issuing a statement, countering angry statements, creating empathy and training reporters are all ways to deal with controversy.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Apr 2006)
 

Crisis Intervention Team

By TR Staff

The Crisis Intervention Team training teaches officers to deal with mentally ill subjects with a different approach.

(This article was originally published in Tactical Response May/Jun 2006)
 

U.S. Attorney LECC 25th Anniversary

By Kevin Gordon

The Law Enforcement Coordinating Committees of the U.S. attorney offices across the country celebrated 25 years of the program in July 2006. The LECC was created to respond to the need for better communication among federal, state and local law enforcement agencies.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Jun 2006)
 

The Angry Police Officer

By Robert Roy Johnson

It is essential in the law enforcement field that supervisors ensure that police officers control their anger. To do so, captains must monitor departmental issues that provoke anger and try to screen out naturally angry people in the hiring process.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Jun 2006)
 

Ten Communication Errors

By Robert Roy Johnson

Read more about how to avoid making some of the errors that can hinder the dissemination of sending and receiving facts within a department, including being distracted, negative, and prejudice.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Aug 2006)
 

The End of 10-Codes?

By James Careless

Interoperability is made difficult between departments with different Signal-Codes and 10-codes, so new federal guidelines encourage plain English radio communication.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Aug 2006)
 

The KISS Principle, Part I

By Scott Oldham

The most important thing new sergeants can learn and experienced supervisors should remember is the old acronym KISS. Realistically, there are five rules that all supervisors should keep in mind, 1) know when to take charge, 2) your badge is gold, not broken, 3) stay true to your people, 4) remember that you have a home and the department isn’t it and 5) never forget you were once one of them.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Sep 2006)
 

Verbal Skills Are Tools

By Robert Roy Johnson

Captains and other police administrators must monitor the use, condition, and appearance of an officer’s equipment and uniform. However, while addressing these administrative responsibilities, middle managers must attend to the interpersonal parallels to equipment and uniform requirements, as well.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Oct 2006)
 

Recognizing Reporter Tactics

By Cara Donlon-Cotton

Handling reporters is just one important part of being a law enforcement officer. Here are some tactics that reporters use to get officers to say more than they should.

(This article was originally published in Law and Order Nov 2006)
 
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