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Kawasaki and the Concours 14

Written by Scott Tulleners

Kawasaki has produced four police motorcycles, the Z1-P (1975-1976), the KZ900 Police Special (1977), the KZ1000C Police (1978-1981) and by far the most common model, the KZ1000P (1982-2005). (Yep, Jon and Ponch rode the Kawasaki KZ900 and KZ1000 in CHiPs.) All these were single rider versions of the “universal Japanese Motorcycle” design that was popular until the market became divided into special categories like sport, touring cruising, etc.

All these motorcycles had inline, four-cylinder engines with a chain drive and 5-speed gearboxes. The KZ1000 engine produced 88 hp and 112 lb-ft of torque. The Police Special for the North American market was produced in a Kawasaki plant at Lincoln, NE. This production ended in September 2005.

Concours 14 and Concours 14 ABS

Kawasaki currently makes a wide variety of motorcycles: sport, supersport, supersport touring, touring, cruisers, dual-purpose, off-road and motocross. The engine displacements range from 65cc motocross and 110cc off-road motorcycles to the big 1700cc touring and 2000cc cruising motors. The Kawasaki Concours™ 14 is in the Supersport Touring class. The Concours 14 is based on the engine and unique monocoque aluminum frame of its Ninja® ZX™ 14 Supersport motorcycle.

The Concours 14 uses a 1352cc, four-stroke, liquid-cooled, Double Over Head Cam (DOHC), four-valve per cylinder, inline four-cylinder engine with variable valve timing and digital fuel injection. The engine produces 156 hp and 102 lb-ft of torque. The Concours 14 uses a 6-speed transmission and a shaft drive. It weighs 679 pounds, and runs on 17-inch tires. This ride uses dual disc front brakes with four piston calipers and a single rear disc. ABS is a $700 option.

Two important features are new for the 2010 model Concours 14. One is the Kawasaki Traction Control (KTRC), which is available only on the ABS version. This is Kawasaki’s first traction control system, which reduces engine output when wheel spin is detected allowing the rear tire to regain traction. KTRC uses the ABS sensors.

The other new feature is the Kawasaki Advanced Coactive-braking Technology (K-ACT), which is obviously only available on the ABS version. This is a Second Generation ABS, which has two modes of operation. K-ACT links the front and rear ABS brakes for two different front-rear brake force distribution. The rider can choose one of two modes to suit riding situation or rider preference. The linked effect from front brake lever actuation is largely the same in both modes, but the linked effect when actuating the rear brake pedal is quite different.

In Standard Mode, rider control is prioritized, with linked effect reduced at initial pedal stroke for natural sensation when sport riding. In High Combined Mode, there’s a more pronounced linked effect from the beginning of the pedal stroke, which is ideal for touring and two-up highway use.

Published in Police Fleet Manager, Nov/Dec 2009

Rating : 6.0


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RET. MOTOR OFFICER KAWI 1000P

By R.T DOWNING SPOKANE CO. SHERIFF. WASH.

THE BACK END LOOKS HEAVY? WHAT IS THE TURNING RADIUS. NOT IMPRESSED WITH THE B.M.WS IN-TOWN TURNING RADIUS, THE KAWI 1000PS WERE PERFECT FOR PARKING LOTS SINGLE LANE 180 S. FASTER IS NOT ALWAYS BETTER ESPECIALLY WITH NEWER YOUNGER MOTOR OFFICERS.

Submitted Feb 9 at 10:46 PM

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